All posts tagged: garden

Summer Festival at Community Market Garden

Sydenham Garden charity is holding its annual summer festival in its community market garden. It is being held on the De Frene Road site (between 35 and 37 De Frene Road, Sydenham, London, SE26 4AB) on Saturday 19th August 12-5 pm. As well as live music from local bands there will be workshops. These include crafts, childrens activities (den building, magical clay faces on trees, creating bubbles and nature crowns), garden sustainability and bee keeping talks, hula hoop taster, pizza spinning and more. The majority of the workshops are free, those that are charged for are all under £5 and there in a small charge on the door. All money raised is for Sydenham Garden which supports people recovering from mental and physical ill-health in Lewisham and surrounding London boroughs. As well as on the door tickets can also be bought in advance here.

Garden Talk: Heavenly hydrangea

Hydrangeas are gorgeous shrubs – their great mounds of delicate yet showy flowers often take on pinky hues into autumn and can be dried for winter use too. There are masses of varieties, colours and sizes to choose from. Here’s my pick: Hydrangea Macrophylla H.macrophylla go pink in alkaline and blue in acidic soil. To guarantee colour – go for white. There are two types, mophead, with large, globular heads and lacecap with flattened heads of tiny flowers surrounded by sterile florets. They’re happiest in part shade but can take sun – and like to be kept hydrated. Macrophylla ‘Madame Emile Mouillere’ A flamboyant white mophead becoming pink tinged into autumn– great for lighting up a partly shady border. Macrophylla ‘Westfalen’ A compact cultivar with bright green leaves and large rich purple mophead blooms. Good for smaller gardens. Macrophylla ‘Veitchii’ A small, elegant and hardy lacecap hydrangea with white sterile florets, that turn pink as they age. Macrophylla ‘Rotchwanz’ A more unusual lacecap with deep pink to wine-colored starry flowers and dark green leaves flushed …

Garden Talk: Deep Purple

Deep purple Flowers aren’t the only way of giving your garden colour and interest –plum coloured-foliage adds real drama, depth and contrast. Use in a few key areas with some sun, (it tend to blend into shady spots) to highlight brighter flowers. Here’s my pick of the best: Perennials Heuchera. I’ve recently discovered the appeal of heuchera – they’re easy to grow in sun or shade and their big evergreen leaves and pretty early flower spires provide winter and spring interest. There are lots of purple varieties such as H. ‘Purple Palace’ and H. ‘Obsidian’ but my favourite is ‘Plum Pudding’ with silvery plum veined leaves. They look gorgeously moody with dark blues and stunning with silvers, soft pinks and mauves. Sedum. S. ‘Matrona’ has dark stems, grey purple leaves and in August, large pale pink flowers – a great combination. The gorgeous S. ‘Blue Pearl’ with deep bluey purple leaves and bright pink flowers is fantastic with silver plants such as Stachys byzantina. Other purple-tinged varieties include ‘Jose Aubergine’ and Sedum telephium ‘Purple Emperor’. …

Step Inside Dulwich: Making the most of your small outdoor space

Summer is nearly here, so it’s time to look at your outdoor space and make it ready to enjoy those long sunny days and balmy evenings with a barbeque and glass of bubbly. Imagine yourself sitting in the perfect small, outdoor space, describe what it would look like and take that as your inspiration. Think of the space as an external room rather than an empty space and decide the primary function it will serve; a space for socializing, a children’s play area, a quiet, secluded retreat where you can escape the world. Here are a few simple ideas that won’t cost a fortune, but help you create that idyllic small outdoor space. Vertical Wall Gardens Where space is limited think vertical. Use walls in a small outdoor garden when space is limited; instead of taking up precious floor space think vertical. Optimise available walls, fencing panels, arbours or arches or simply create your own vertical garden wall. Living walls can look fantastic in small town gardens or even on flat balconies. Many different types …

Eight ways to go organic in the garden

It’s easy to panic and reach for a chemical spray at the first sight of greenfly or diseased plants. But there’s a more natural way. Here’s how: Encourage wildlife. Instead of using pesticides that will harm all insects good and bad – lure in the beneficial ones. Ladybirds and hoverfly larvae will eat aphids – they like chives, fennel and cosmos, or invest in a bug hotel. Ground beetles eat slugs. Birds will help keep down snails as will frogs. Try a birdbath, feeder or berries for birds and a little pond for frogs. Keep weeds down naturally. Weeds carry disease, and steal light, water and nutrients from your plants. A thick mulch of bark or well rotten manure will keep them at bay, as will pulling them out as young seedlings. Patrol to keep control. Aphids like the new tender growth of plants like clematis and rose buds, so keep an eye out for them – they can make leaves curl up. Squish them off by hand, or use a strong spritz of water. …