All posts filed under: News

The Young Lewisham Project

Two members of staff from The Young Lewisham Project together with six other people will form part of a team of eight who will be competing in 24 Heures Velo (website www.24heuresvelo.fr), a 24 hour cycle race taking place at the legendary Le Mans race circuit in France over the August Bank Holiday weekend. The team decided to take up this challenge so they could help raise much needed funds for The Young Lewisham Project, a registered charity (number: 1118469) based in Forest Hill. Established in 1974, it offers a wide range of supportive, alternative vocational programmes to young people who are not succeeding in mainstream education for a variety of reasons. Unfortunately, back in 2015 The Young Lewisham Project which was mostly supported by the local authority had all of it’s funding withdrawn and is now working hard to replace it. Please consider supporting this fundraising initiative which will help ensure the charity can continue to offer young people vocational activities on a weekly basis enabling them to learn new practical skills and lead onto them obtaining …

Sailing the seven seas for ALD Life

Jon Milne is fundraising for ALD Life by going on an exciting adventure across the seven seas in the prestigious 2017 Round the World Clipper Race. Jon is married to the longstanding trustee and treasurer of ALD. Jon has entered a state of temporary retirement while he undertakes the greatest adventure of his life. Setting sail on August the 20th, he will be circumnavigating the world as part of the Clipper 17-18 Round the World Race. As one of a twenty-two member crew taking part in this year’s race, the brainchild of Sir Robin Knox-Johnston, he has chosen to take part in the full circumnavigation of the globe and aim to complete the 40,000-mile race which is split into eight legs and will see him sail across five oceans and six continents. The fleet of twelve identically matched 70-foot sea faring racing yachts will be his home for 11 months, with a gruelling 4 hour on, four hours off watch and will take him through some of the most treacherous waters in the world. For nearly twenty years now Jon has had a …

Pet’s corner: Teaching your dog ‘leave’

The leave command, also known as ‘dog zen’, is possibly the most important command of all. ‘Leave’, as distinct from ‘drop’, tells the dog to disengage from an object, another animal or a human, on cue. The importance of ‘leave’ is that it teaches the dog to control its instinctive urge to move towards things that it wants or things that it dislikes and for owners this can become a powerful and incredibly useful tool. A solid ‘leave’ should be essential puppy training, up there with an instant ‘sit’, beautiful lead manners and an impeccable recall. There are different ways to teach this command and most trainers will have a preference. However, the essential aim is to teach the dog that a tiny disengagement (averting its eyes momentarily or looking away) earns a reward. Once the dog understands this principle the owner can then begin to ask for more of the required behaviour before a reward is delivered. Here is an example of how to teach the first stage of ‘leave’. Hold a treat on …

The Last Word – Jack Thompson

Jack Thompson was born a long time ago in the north of England. He worked as a teacher, a pianist in clubs and pubs, and a bus conductor. He was a BBC correspondent in the 1980s and 90s doing spells in Asia, the Middle East, the Soviet Union and eastern and central Europe. He also read the news on BBC World TV. He turned freelance in 2002, writing articles on all sorts of subjects and trying his hand at thrillers. His first one, A Wicked Device, about a plot to restore totalitarian rule to Germany, won the Scottish Association of Writers Pitlochry Award for Crime-Writing in 2006. His wife, Kathryn Davies, is also a journalist. She’s worked for the BBC, the Financial Times and The Guardian. She now translates Russian texts into English. How long have you lived in the area? We came to Dulwich in 1986. We had lived in Forest Hill in the 70s before our first foreign assignments as journalists in south east Asia. Knowing we would eventually have to set up …

Step Inside Dulwich: The Front Door, the External Focal Point of the Home…

Have you noticed that some houses’ simply have much more curb appeal than other properties? This is not only assessed on the grandeur or splendor of the building, more often than not on the character or style the property presents to the outside world. Attractive landscaping and planting, good fencing and gates, structural features, exterior lighting, all contribute to creating that special curb appeal. But the front door is often underrated in its importance. It is the focal point of the house, the welcoming face and entry portal into the family home. The front door suffers more wear and tear than any interior door in the house, it has to perform multiple functions; keeping out hostile weather conditions, providing security, informing location, the access for postal and delivery services, the calling system for visitors and the primary entry and exit point for our furniture and belongings. The front door can create that first good impression, with regular maintenance it can last for decades but with wear and tear it can become damaged or decayed and …