All posts filed under: News

Spicy Parsnip Soup

For me it isn’t so much about a diet in January, but more about getting back to basics.  After all the sweet, rich Christmas food I really enjoy getting the more basic but very warming dishes that this time of year brings.  This soup is a real winter warmer that is very easy to make. Spicy Parsnip Soup (serves 4) Ingredients 700g parsnips 2 tsp curry powder 1 tbsp groundnut or vegetable oil 2 medium onions 2 or 3 medium potatoes 2 cloves garlic 2 pints vegetable stock Heat the oil in a large saucepan and add the peeled and chopped onion. Cook gently for about 5 minutes then add the crushed garlic and the curry powder. Leave to simmer gently for a few minutes then add the peeled and chopped parsnips. Give it all a good stir then add the stock, bring to the boil and simmer gently for 1-2 hours. Blend the soup with a hand blender or in a food processor. Serve with chunks of wholemeal bread.   Enjoy! In season at …

Eco gardening – how to make compost

Eco gardening – how to make compost If you’re looking for a green way of recycling your garden waste, composting could be for you. It’s also hugely satisfying knowing your veg peelings and egg boxes are going to good use. It can take six months or more, but you’ll eventually be rewarded with crumbly brown compost to feed your garden with nutrients. Here’s what you need to know: What to compost: You need to be selective about what you put in in compost. Meat, fish, dairy products or cooked food can’t go in. Horse manure is fine but not dog or cat faeces. Avoid weeds with tap roots that regrow such as dandelions, seeding weeds, diseased plants and anything treated with pesticide. There are two types of organic material that can be used: green (wet, nitrogen-rich) and brown (dry, carbon-rich). You need about 2:1 brown to green. Examples include: Brown, carbon-rich ingredients Straw and hay. Woodchips, sawdust, wood ash – in moderation (untreated wood). Dried grass clippings and dry leaves Hair and animal fur 100% …

5 Steps To Help Set Achievable Health Goals And Succeed!

Happy New Year and welcome to January 2020. I hope you’re doing well with your resolutions and your goals. You may have found you’ve already had a little bit of a wobble. However, whatever stage you’re at, I want to talk about how you can make your goals a success. The fact that we’ve entered a new year isn’t going to be enough to get you through the stages of change. You cannot rely on the fact that it’s a new year with a “new year, new you” concept. You really need to be clear on your intent – the calendar change isn’t enough. Ask yourself, what is your intent? What do you really want to get done? I would always try and find out what really sits behind that goal, because very often it is more than just the weight loss (for example). What it really could be about is repressed trauma, or very low self-esteem, or even a deep anxiety about your future health – it could be any number of things. But …

Selce: bringing some sunshine to South East London

Camilla Berens, chair of South East London Community Energy, explains how a mixture of people power and sunlight is creating a new kind of organisation. London needs more clean, green renewable energy and the Selce co-operative is helping to speed up the transition. Five years ago a group of local people came together with a common vision. All of us wanted to take action on climate change and we agreed that the best place to start was in our own back yard. Today, South East London Community Energy is starting to make a real difference. So far, we’ve raised over £500,000 and we’ve used this money to install solar arrays on seven local primary schools. We’re currently on target to provide four further arrays for a church, two co-operatively-run leisure centres and pioneering moon sculpture. The way we raise our money is through ‘community share offers’; a method that ensures everyone benefits. You can find more details about how Selce’s community share offers work at: selce.org.uk/se-solar. People-powered solar energy Here’s how it works. Anyone who …

Pets Corner: Why use a houseline?

  Those of you with autumn pups will now be heading towards dog adolescence and all the challenges that brings. Young dogs often go off the rails at this time and the ‘perfect puppy’ can suddenly morph into ‘Dennis the Menace’. Puppy play biting can try our patience but teenage zoomies- which might involve nipping human body parts as your hound does the wall of death round your living room- can tip us all over the edge. Adolescence is also the time unwanted behaviours like jumping up at guests re-emerge. The teenage brain gets overloaded by the process of growing up and the dogs can seem to regress. As we know, teenagers also tend to push the boundaries and try new things. Young dogs may suddenly refuse to move from a comfy spot on the sofa when asked or go deaf to your recall cue when out in the garden.  Most of these issues are temporary and owners should stick with all and any training through this stage. However, a houseline can become an invaluable …