All posts filed under: Home and Garden

Homemade lemon table decorations

Freshen your Lunch or dinner table this May with these unique Lemon table decorations. They can be used as place settings, or grouped as a centrepiece. You will need A bag of lemons Flowers, I used Orange Roses, Alstroemaria, and a selection from the garden. Secateurs and a sharp kitchen knife Craft tags Step1 – cut off the bottom of your lemon, so it sits flat. Then cut the top of, about ¼ so you have a nice little flower holder Step 2 – cut your rose leaving about 3-4 inches of stem, and place in the middle of the lemon. Hold the stalk firmly when pushing into the lemon so as not to break it. Step 3 – work around the centre rose with your assorted flowers and foliage – to make a miniature posy. Step 4 – write your guests names on the craft tags, and tie to the stem of the rose. Step 5 – place on your table, make sure you use a plate or saucer so as not to stain …

Luscious lawns

Now is the time to give your grass a bit of spring TLC if you want a lawn to be proud of this summer. Here are eight jobs to give it a lift – even just a few of these will be a step in the right direction. Rake leaves. Rake off any leaves and other garden debris built up over the winter. Give it a trim. As the weather warms up and your grass starts to grow again, you can start mowing. Choose a dry day and use the highest setting so as not to scalp the lawn. Remove weeds. Regular mowing will remove most of the annual weeds but not the pesky perennial weeds such as thistles and dandelions. Weed killer is an option, but I prefer to dig them out by hand, removing the whole taproot to avoid it re-growing. Scarify. This is where you rake off the ‘thatch’ – dead grass, debris and moss – one of the biggest problems with lawns. Use a wire rake and don’t worry if it …

Interior Design advice from Bradley Viljoen: Picture Hanging

I find I am often called in by clients to give advice on how best to display pictures they have accumulated over the years. Some paintings have already found a place in the home but others, whether acquired through inheritance, or bought in a short-lived moment of excitement, have been left sleeping in dusty lofts or hidden corners awaiting their moment to shine. When buying pictures my philosophy is always to buy what you love. Placing pictures, however, is a skill, as too is the job of picture hanging. Common mistakes are hanging artwork too high so one must crane one’s neck to see it or having too many similar sized pictures. I am always minded by my client’s own design aesthetic, be it a love of symmetry or asymmetry, formal or relaxed, full or spartan. Whatever your preference, here are my 8 top tips to create an interesting scheme: Mounting – the cheapest and most uninteresting pictures can be made exceptional by a variety of well-chosen frames (think Gesso, distressed, hand-painted, lacquered, or gilt …

Home-made kitchen herb wreath

Spring is all about awakening your senses after the grey days, and bleak nights. A herb wreath is a delightful alternative to Spring flowers. It is fragrant and affordable, once dried the herbs can be used for adding flavour to your cooking. You will need: A wet oasis base – I bought mine on Amazon A pair of secateurs or sharp scissors A selection of herbs…I used Bay from my garden, and bought Rosemary and thyme from my local supermarket. A round tray, dinner plate or charger Candles – optional Simple! Step 1 – Submerge your base in water. This will keep your arrangement fresh for much longer Step 2 – cut your herbs into workable pieces – approximately 4-5 inches long Step 3 – Work your way around the base sticking your herb sprigs firmly into the oasis. base Layer the herbs for texture and depth of colour.   Step 4 – Place your wreath onto your tray, wooden board, plate or charger to avoid making your surface. Step 5 – add your candles to …

Want to get down to earth?

Want to get down to earth? Then get to Emmanuel wildlife garden, off  Chalford Road, West Dulwich on the last Wednesday afternoon (2-4pm) of every month. Norwood Wildlife team created a garden on a patch between Emmanuel, a Parish Church, and their neighbours 12yrs ago and have recently returned it to its original purpose with the help of Church members.  The main garden is an orchard of wild fruit trees, crab apple, cherry, plum (and soon pear) to feed the birds.  Around it is a hawthorn hedge with cow parsley and other hedgerow plants. At the entrance to the area stands a magnificent Rowan tree underplanted with primroses, dog violets and wild grape hyacinths and a long bed nearby is a showpiece for bigger subjects such as teasel, burdock and thistles. John Cotter, the Norwood team leader, says beginners will be welcome and he hopes they will go on to work on the team’s main project, Norwood Park’s Country Walk, a winding path across 3 acres which have been planted with most of the trees and …